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Alec Bradley, Rocky Patel, Maria Mancini, Camacho, Flor de Copan, Flor de Selva, Oscar Valladres, etc.

Cigars from Honduras

The small republic of Honduras borders Guatemala to the northwest, El Salvador to the west and Nicaragua to the south, and is flanked by the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The tropical rainforest covers almost half of the country and offers breathtaking flora and fauna. Like many Central American countries, Honduras is crisscrossed by numerous volcanoes, which has strongly shaped the country's tobacco tradition and the offshore Caribbean islands have emerged. The many rivers flow exclusively in an easterly direction through the valleys of the plateau and flow into the Atlantic Ocean. The ruins of Copan are the largest cultural monument in Honduras and still bear witness to the great Mayan rulers. Copan lies on the northwestern border with Guatemala and was an important hub in the Maya empire. The city reached its heyday in the 8th century and was abandoned two centuries later. Already with the arrival of Christopher Columbus the indigenous population had disappeared without a trace and only weathered traces of the former rulers could be seen. It was also Columbus who gave the country its name, as there are unusual depths off the country's Atlantic coast. Honduras is derived from “Hondura” and translated from Spanish means depth.

The largest tobacco growing area in Honduras is the state of "El Paraiso", a predominantly mountainous area on the southern border with Nicaragua that is in the immediate vicinity of Nueva Segovia and Esteli. El Paraiso is on average 800 meters above sea level and pushes the tropical climate of the country to a pleasant 20°C in the annual mean. In addition to the excellent weather conditions, the particularly fertile soils offer the best conditions for tobacco cultivation. The ideal conditions are still adorned today by the centuries-old tradition of tobacco cultivation, because the Maya began to grow tobacco in Honduras. The area around the ruins of Copan is still used for tobacco cultivation today.

The small republic of Honduras borders Guatemala to the northwest , El Salvador to the west and Nicaragua to the south , and is flanked by the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans . The... read more »
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Cigars from Honduras

The small republic of Honduras borders Guatemala to the northwest, El Salvador to the west and Nicaragua to the south, and is flanked by the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The tropical rainforest covers almost half of the country and offers breathtaking flora and fauna. Like many Central American countries, Honduras is crisscrossed by numerous volcanoes, which has strongly shaped the country's tobacco tradition and the offshore Caribbean islands have emerged. The many rivers flow exclusively in an easterly direction through the valleys of the plateau and flow into the Atlantic Ocean. The ruins of Copan are the largest cultural monument in Honduras and still bear witness to the great Mayan rulers. Copan lies on the northwestern border with Guatemala and was an important hub in the Maya empire. The city reached its heyday in the 8th century and was abandoned two centuries later. Already with the arrival of Christopher Columbus the indigenous population had disappeared without a trace and only weathered traces of the former rulers could be seen. It was also Columbus who gave the country its name, as there are unusual depths off the country's Atlantic coast. Honduras is derived from “Hondura” and translated from Spanish means depth.

The largest tobacco growing area in Honduras is the state of "El Paraiso", a predominantly mountainous area on the southern border with Nicaragua that is in the immediate vicinity of Nueva Segovia and Esteli. El Paraiso is on average 800 meters above sea level and pushes the tropical climate of the country to a pleasant 20°C in the annual mean. In addition to the excellent weather conditions, the particularly fertile soils offer the best conditions for tobacco cultivation. The ideal conditions are still adorned today by the centuries-old tradition of tobacco cultivation, because the Maya began to grow tobacco in Honduras. The area around the ruins of Copan is still used for tobacco cultivation today.

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